“Father released me”

Accelerating care, temporal repair, and ritualized friendship among Pentecostal women in Samoa

by JESSICA HARDIN

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In Samoan Pentecostal churches, ritualized friendships among women are an informal but essential relationship through which churches grow. The mentorship that women provide when a new convert is introduced to church life creates escalating forms of care and obligation, as well as an experience of urgency and acceleration. Converts learn how to construct rupture in their narratives and spiritual practices, which are modeled in peer socialization practices. This period of intense yet temporary mentorship creates a temporality of “repair”—embodied, linguistic, and social practices that restore the convert's identity, which has been disrupted by conversion. This care work compels us to consider the temporalization of care as a future‐making endeavor.